Wonderfully-Different

My parents sent me some of the original materials surrounding my adoption and it’s neat to walk through these old documents.

Here are a few pictures (glad I didn’t have parasites… ewww!):

I’m tempted to say something that isn’t true so I won’t… … … sometimes I feel as if I should be more emotional about my adoption and my atypical past but I don’t feel much emotion about most if it.

My start in life was a gift, full-stop. I was lucky enough to be born with another human being and will always have a lifelong friend. Two amazing humans on the other side of the world decided that they wanted to grow their family and I was blessed to join them. A solid decision, I’d say. 👍🏼

I’m not mad or angry or sad or upset at this point. I’m at peace with my story and I’m sticking with it.

We don’t have to be defined by our past but we can, if we choose, embrace it and adopt it as our own.

For instance, the only reason why anyone would think anything about my place of origin or the circumstances around my birth is because of my wonderfully-different surname—"Saddington" is clearly not a typical asian last name. And, if my parents had opted to keep my Korean name as my proper name then no one would be the wiser.

I could change my surname as some folks do but that seems like a needless and pointless exercise. This is who I am and there’s no shame in any of it.

If anything, we all have a chance to be whomever we want and let our actions create the definition around our person and character.

That’s the plan, at least for now.


It’s worth mentioning that my birth name was actually incorrectly documented! My birthmother informed me that she gave me the name Jin instead of Joon but apparently they got that mixed up.

That was a non-trivial event.

🙃